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Container Gardening Part 4

1 March 2010 No Comment

This is the last part of the 4 part series. We are going to discuss insects, diseases, sunlight and the best part, harvesting your vegetables!

Insects and Diseases
Vegetables grown in containers will be just as likely to get diseases and insect problems as vegetables grown in gardens. You should check your vegetables periodically for harmful insects and diseases. You can now by organic pesticides and herbicides at any local garden center. Follow the instructions on the product labels.

Sunlight
All vegetables are going to require sunlight. Some will require more than others, and this may also help determine what type of vegetables you are going to plant. One advantage to vegetable container gardening is you can move your containers around to receive the best possible sunlight. Different vegetables require varying degrees of sunlight such as, tomatoes, peppers and eggplants or fruit bearing will require full sun to do well. Spinach, lettuce and parsley and most leafy type vegetables can tolerate some shade. Root type vegetables such as carrots, radishes and onions will also require lots of sun, but not quite as much as the fruit bearing vegetables such as tomatoes and peppers.

Harvesting
You have watered, fertilized and meticulously taken care of your vegetables and they have grown to maturity and it’s time to harvest! Vegetables should be harvested at their peak of maturity when their full flavor has developed. If you have never tasted a tomato from your own garden you will not believe the difference from a store bought tomato. After your vegetables are done producing discard the plants and don’t reuse the soil for next year. Infected soils will reproduce the same diseases the following year. If you have a compost pile you can safely discard it there.

Container vegetable gardening can be fun and rewarding if you follow the guidelines above. Plant growth will depend on the attention you give it and the location. Keep track of how your vegetables do in different locations and move them around to see if certain locations work better than others. Good luck!

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